Politics & Religion

I find at this time in the cycle of American politics, people on either side of the political spectrum seem to truly enjoy slinging mud at each other and speaking ill of each other’s preferred candidate. This is true to some extent in any country. And those who claim to be Christians seem to be the greatest offenders.

I’ve always been perplexed at this seemingly incongruous fact. Bruce Reyes-Chow reflects on this in his blog and offers some insight:

It seems that supporters of both parties are pretty inconsistent when it comes to examining what the campaigns are putting out there about the economy, healthcare, foreign policy, taxes, poverty, etc. Generally speaking, when we like and support a candidate, we believe them and if we don’t support a candidate, we find every way to discount their every claim as an utter lie.

Seeing as many of the people who show up in my various news streams are of the Christian variety, I have noticed the same patterns when we approach Scripture. Now don’t worry, I am not trying to equate our political system and God’s movement in the world. I am only pointing out  how we tend to approach our beliefs in times of disagreement. These are the things that I have noticed:

When we read the Bible, The Word of God…

  • We lean into and take at face value passages that reinforce our already held beliefs.
  • We dig deeper into the history and context of the passages in order to discount any that call our beliefs into question

When we hear words from politicians…

  • We lean into and take at face value the words that our preferred politicians says.
  • We dig deeper into the words from politicians we don’t like in order to discount their version of the truth.

In both of these cases we are basically doing two things: one, finding all the support we can to affirm our already held beliefs and, two, finding anything we can to discount the beliefs that others might hold as true. In the end, we are more concerned with making sure that we are right, rather than being open to the possibility that our beliefs might need to change, shift or … heaven forbid, be scrapped in totality. (Read the full post here.)

I don’t believe anyone could agree 100% with any politician’s policies or values. That is a reality of life. It’s up to responsible citizens to weigh what is being said and what is being done against what is right and good for the nation, and then vote accordingly.

Brian McLaren has put this well in his three recent politically-focused ebooks: The Word of the Lord to . . . Democrats, Republicans and Evangelicals respectively. These are well worth reading and are available via Amazon and other reputable ebook sales sites.

Regardless of how you choose to vote–either in the upcoming U.S. election or in next year’s Australian election–don’t simply tow the party line. Look at the issues and values and vote for the leader who best reflects God’s concern for the world: the poor, the marginalised, the stranger, and the vulnerable.

. . . Oh, and we need to remain open to the reality that many of those beliefs and ‘truths’ we now hold dear may one day turn out to be poorly founded or totally wrong.

Realising this, Reyes-Chow concludes his post:

In the end, there are no easy answers and I find strength in the fact that we will always fall short of perfection. But if we can all acknowledge these realities of shared hypocrisy and extend a little grace towards our enemies in these times of battle, maybe we will all see the other side of this election season a little less bruised and battered from the fight.

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